Our authors

Nadine Kessler is a graphic designer based in Hobart, Tasmania.was trained as a typographer and graphic designer in Basel, Switzerland and RISD, Rhode Island, USA. She has worked over a decade in the design industry, mainly with clients in the cultural sector, in Australia, Germany and Switzerland. Her expertise in typography led her to teach Advanced Typography at the University of Tasmania for five years. She has given lectures and facilitated workshops Australia wide. 


Tom O'Hern lives in Hobart, he makes drawings and paintings, he's represented by a few galleries - like Bett Gallery in Hobart. He's great. 

 

Craig San Roque, was born in difficult circumstances in 1943 and grew up in country towns, mostly Condobolin. He went to Sydney (1961) and failed at several things. In 1968 he went to Europe, became known as Craig San Roque and didn't come back for 20 years. In London he was sentenced to psychoanalysis.  This took a long time and was very interesting. Psychoanalysis is a sentence from which you are never released. In 1986 he came back to Sydney and didn't fail so much and did very interesting things with good people. He was known as a psychoanalyst. He did legitimately qualify. In 1992 he went back to country towns. In this case, Alice Springs, where he has now spent many long weekends analysing intoxication and how it works. In 2000 Dr. Tom Singer asked him to write about complex cultural matters. And he did this including in - The Vision Thing, The Cultural Complex,Psyche and the City, Placing Psyche. Growing Up In Central Australia and other books.


Joshua Santospirito grew up in suburban Melbourne and has lived in a few different places. He is a mental health nurse, comics-maker, muso and veggie patch dweller who lives in Hobart, Tasmania.  When he was very young he wanted to make comics for a living. When he grew up he forgot all about that and became a nurse. Then whilst he was casting about trying to understand the complex world he found himself in he rediscovered comics as way of articulating difficult issues. Since then he hasn’t looked back ... much. Look up his website for other adventures in print. 


Tricky Walsh is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice is concerned with the integration of mysticism with scientific reasoning. Her work, which is architectural in nature, and broadly spatial in practice utilises the construction of concepts and devices which allow for the development of both physical and philosophical systems of discovery and invention. She is represented by Bett Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania, and MARS Gallery in Melbourne, and has been the recipient of Australia Council and Arts Tasmania funding, and in 2009 won the Hobart Art prize for her sculpture The Wasp project.